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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
. [laughter] now the liberal truth bader ginsberg is having a field die with riens' gop convention speech they called misleading, bretbreath takingly mishonest. or as paul ryan might put it, they said he was breathtaking and would be greatest at pleading the world. in a word, he shown. [laughter] and now they've jumped on something he said this weekend. >> are you still running? >> yes, i hurt a disc in my back. >> stephen: you ran a marathon at some point. >> yes. >> stephen: i have to ask what is your personal best. >> 103 -- two hours 60 something. >> stephen: you go down to miami university. now under three hours. that's pretty good to put that in perspective, lance armstrong finished the new york city marathon in under three hours and his water bottle was phone of methylate cheetah plasma. but according to notoriously liberal jogging rag runner's world, paul ryan has run one marathon and finished in four hours, one minute 25 seconds. is that a mistake. three fours, four hours. marathon runners don't keep track of these things. they just do it for the love of the nipple pleading. i
east policy to president jimmy carter, mark ginsberg. thank you for joining us tonight. we've tapped into your wisdom individually many times in the past. let's begin sequentially and go through where things are beginning with libya. where this appeared to begin. what do we know about the derivation of these protests and what caused it? >> i think right now, the administration has backed off -- initial impression this might be connected with al-qaeda. there are reasons we can go into why that was a plausible conjecture. it appears to have been it was a group, unlike al-qaeda is not a transnational group. it is a libyan extremist islamist, armed group. therefore, very dangerous to libya. and from everything we can tell, they either opportunistically seized on this or caused it to happen. it's quite different from cairo in the sense it's not even clear there was a spontaneous gathering of a crowd there at all. clearly, there was a decision at some point by ansar says is a rogue group. there was a decision to use
us is mark ginsberg former ambassador to morocco. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning. >> how troubling is this to you, sir? >> oh, it's extremely troubling. i know libya well. i obviously know north africa well. the fact that a colleague in the foreign service and other members of the consulate may have been killed on a premeditated attack on a consulate is extraordinarily disturbing. it's the first u.s. ambassador that has lost his life in the line of duty since 1979. benghazi has been particularly troublesome to the central libyan government. it has always been the hotbed of islamic extremism in libya. we cannot underestimate the travails that the libyan government still has in trying to consolidate control over the country and the fact of the matter is, is that there are extremist elements operating in eastern benghazi and this clearly had to be a premeditated attack on the consulate and it's just a terrible shame because chris was one of the greatest arabist diplomats in the region, someone who dedicated many years to helping to consolidate freedom in libya. he worked in
of the ginsberg mcclear group, aaron mcclear. glad to have you back on the show. >> thanks. melissa: the manhattan institute was talking about how for decades especially after world war ii from 1960 to 2010 the population of california increase creased by 137%. people were moving to california for the weather, promise, space industry or space on the ground. there were a lot of people coming out to california. since then we've seen. that was the stat we were showing. since 1990 the state has seen 3.4 million people do the exact opposite thing. and move away from the west coast. why do you think that is? >> well, we still have a lot of those reasons for people to come out here. it is the most gorgeous piece of real estate on the planet. absolutely beautiful out here. the weather is great. melissa: right. >> our ag system is wonderful. we have high-tech, biotech doing very well. there is a lot of positive things out here. melissa: but? >> the problem is the folks in charge are sew focused on environmental regulations which are a good idea because it is so beautiful out here we want to keep it that wa
of the justices ruth bader ginsberg is 79 but she is in frail health. >> john: indeed. >> we do focus on the court for good reason around abortion rights, critical issues like that. but what this issue looks at is how this court has empowered the 1% at the expense of the 99%, that the powerful have their thumbs all over this court while the working people are getting the shaft from this court. >> john: absolutely. >> shielding financial institutions from accountability. and of course in the citizens united decision of 2010 it allowed the infusion of money into an all right polluted political system, which takes us back to our platform because so many issues we brought up, these are connected to the money in our politics. there's a reason we don't have some of these reforms or the reforms that president obama fought for. >> even though the public wants? >> exactly. >> the congress and the courts -- >> john: but it wasn't popular with joe lieberman, so we're not going to have it. >> right. >> the danger is the more and more that the scales are tipped towards the su
. >> john: thank you. ruth ginsberg is 131 years old -- >> but she doesn't look a day over 35. >> john: that's right. even if you are a republican you just show up and vote on the first wednesday of november all right? [ laughter ] >> john: let's go to paul in nevada. good morning, you are on the "stephanie miller show." >> caller: good morning, john, frank, and it's a real pleasure to talk to you, kelly. i loved your father i thought he was acutely cognizant and was not fooled by the smoke and mirrors. >> john: and neither are the listeners to "stephanie miller show." >> he had an experience with coke and mirrors, but -- [ laughter ] >> caller: that was a good one. >> well done frank. >> caller: the quip of romney having his birther joke there were nuns in the background that were having a huge laugh on that. >> john: as a child of a former nun i was embarrassed by that. >> caller: yeah. and i originally am from washington, d.c., and i sew george carlin at the constitution hall, it was one of the best moments of my life, because i loved george carlin i always thou
ginsberg lock 83 donald's so much he decided to eat only mcdonald's food three times a day for 30 days. what happened? he gained 24 pounds. surprise. that would of happened 58 at ihop three times per day. he only wanted to vilify mcdonald's. why didn't he choose to eat ice cream sundaes, or cheese, canned ham? that would not have made him with a mess or make him the michael moore of his generation. he should have followed michael moore around all day. [laughter] of that would have been fun to watch. the truth is super size me was a stunt and super sized his bank account. i am for that. many as other potential targets are scared. starbucks that sell sugar and high calorie coffee drinks are exempt from the fast-food hatred from liberals. you can get that on a double quarter pounder with cheese they want to pass laws. if it is on a lot say with a caramel shot their delighted to look the of their way. it shows on to progress. howard schultz the founder of starbucks took something what americans love and could serve it faster and better. job skills training? liberals hate that. food that is
published their first major books within weeks of each other. i follow that with allen ginsberg, james baldwin, christopher isherwood, tennessee williams was also working at this time too, this is like the first wave, and they caught a lot of grief for what they wrote. right after world war ii, homosexuality was illegal in all 48 states. you couldn't talk openly as a gay person. but you could write fiction about it and say i'm not writing about myself, i'm writing about these other people who are fictional. everybody saw through this white lie and understood what was going on. but they caught a little use from critics about it. the critics couldn't say, oh, you're clearly a homosexual, that would've been liable at this time. they found other ways to kind of complaint and attack and criticize. this first-generation caught a lot of great rema so how explicit are open could a james baldwin be or a christian be? >> they were initially very open. the second novel, giovanni's room, is about -- it's about two white men in paris, one of the great black american writers. before his second novel
, roof dedekind's bird. -- ruth bather ginsberg. my biggest supporter on the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch. and he confirmed that. the hearings when over three days, but there were no hardball questions. so the senators were mostly using me to speak to me to their constituents to show how caring there were, how well- informed they were. [laughter] they spent a lot more time talking benighted. [laughter] -- they spend a lot more time talking than i did. [laughter] i helped to launch the women's rights project. i had been on the council for seven years. there was not a single question, not a single question about my aclu affiliation. i think what it will take is great stakes on both sides of the aisle and this is not the fault of one party rather than the other. the over 30-votes for someone qualified in any case, it will take both sides of the aisle to come together and say it enough, this is not the way it should be. we should be approving judges. a person who is devoted to the law, to do the hard work that is involved. that is what should count. there was a great m
attorneys with constitutional issues. the first lecture was unconstitutional given by ginsberg of the d.c. circuit. since then and has been subjects ranging from property rights progressivism and is subject of last year's speech which was of the sa of the supreme court review that has just come out and you can get it by going to the qaeda web site. we begin this second decade of the lectures the honorable paul clement as one of the gifted practitioners to appear rick urie before the supreme court. is currently a partner although his practice takes too far and wide. serving from june 2005 through 2008. he served as acting general for were the fiercest more than seven years of service which is the longest period since the 19th century. he argued over 60 cases of course, the case with which we began the conference today. he received his bachelor's degree and a master's degree from cambridge university. he graduated from harvard law school where he was the supreme court editor of the harvard law review. then he clerked coalesce circuit and ford justice scalia and one on to serve as chief co
place. you could see justice begins byrd, now that she is accomplished, she was -- ginsberg, now that she is accomplished, we may see her retire if obama wins. it makes a huge potential shift in the court based on the next president. you could have up to three additional nominees if something else happened and that would give a obama the opportunity to appoint the majority of the members of the supreme court, or it would give romney a chance to possibly shift the balance. anyone replacing justice kennedy will affect the balance, making it easier, assuming the president knows who to pick. >> you said retirements during this term. my prediction would be none. they all seem to be pretty healthy. >> in four years they could think it would be great to have somebody to replace me, but for years is a long time. i will worry about that later, i am having fun now. >> speaking of fun, we please join me in thanking our panel. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> at 5:00 eastern, we will go to the united nations f
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)